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23rd April 2012

Photo reblogged from oh look, it's history with 487 notes

ohlookhistory:

A heart locked with a key, and a secret message: the colored stones have initial letters that spell ‘REGARD’: ruby, emerald, garnet, amethyst, ruby and diamond. This arrangement of stones was also popular in ‘regard’ rings. The pendant opens to reveal a panel of woven hair under glass.

ca.1840, from the Victoria and Albert Museum. 

ohlookhistory:

A heart locked with a key, and a secret message: the colored stones have initial letters that spell ‘REGARD’: ruby, emerald, garnet, amethyst, ruby and diamond. This arrangement of stones was also popular in ‘regard’ rings. The pendant opens to reveal a panel of woven hair under glass.

ca.1840, from the Victoria and Albert Museum. 

Tagged: historyvictorianjewellerylove19th centurygold

15th February 2012

Photo with 59 notes

Charlotte Brontë(1816-55)To Professor Constantin Héger, 18 November 1844While studying languages in Brussels, Charlotte Brontë became infatuated with her Belgian professor. On her return to England, she wrote to him, revealing the extent of her feelings, and confessing: “Truly I find it difficult to be cheerful solong as I think I shall never see you more.” Her letters were torn up in shock by the professor who was married with children. Curiously, it is thanks to his wife, who retrieved them from the waste-paper basket, that we are privy to their contents today

Charlotte Brontë
(1816-55)
To Professor Constantin Héger, 18 November 1844
While studying languages in Brussels, Charlotte Brontë became infatuated with her Belgian professor. On her return to England, she wrote to him, revealing the extent of her feelings, and confessing: “Truly I find it difficult to be cheerful solong as I think I shall never see you more.” Her letters were torn up in shock by the professor who was married with children. Curiously, it is thanks to his wife, who retrieved them from the waste-paper basket, that we are privy to their contents today

Tagged: historyvictorian19th centurylitlettersbrontelove

Source: Guardian

12th February 2012

Post with 2 notes

Love

We cannot live, except thus mutually
We alternate, aware or unaware,
The reflex act of life: and when we bear
Our virtue onward most impulsively,
Most full of invocation, and to be
Most instantly compellant, certes, there
We live most life, whoever breathes most air
And counts his dying years by sun and sea.
But when a soul, by choice and conscience, doth
Throw out her full force on another soul,
The conscience and the concentration both
Make mere life, Love. For Life in perfect whole
And aim consummated, is Love in sooth,
As nature’s magnet-heat rounds pole with pole.
—-by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Tagged: historypoetrywomenlit19th centuryvictorianlovesonnet

Source: poetryfoundation.org

1st January 2012

Photo with 2 notes

 

The Long Engagement, By Arthur Hughes (1859)

Hughes exhibited this painting in 1859 with a quotation from Chaucer’s ‘Troilus and Criseyde’:

For how myght ever sweetnesse hav be known / To hym that never tastyd bitternesse?

This work evolved out of an unfinished attempt at the Shakespearean subject of ‘Orlando in the Forest of Arden’ but the figures were later painted out. Birmingham holds a number of important sketches which chart the transformation of the work from the original literary subject to a scene from contemporary life.
As a poorly paid cleric, he is perhaps too poor to marry or become engaged, as the young woman’s hand displays no engagement ring. The length of their courtship is indicated by the ivy having grown over her name, Amy, which was cut long ago into the tree.

 

The Long Engagement, By Arthur Hughes (1859)

Hughes exhibited this painting in 1859 with a quotation from Chaucer’s ‘Troilus and Criseyde’:

For how myght ever sweetnesse hav be known / To hym that never tastyd bitternesse?

This work evolved out of an unfinished attempt at the Shakespearean subject of ‘Orlando in the Forest of Arden’ but the figures were later painted out. Birmingham holds a number of important sketches which chart the transformation of the work from the original literary subject to a scene from contemporary life.

As a poorly paid cleric, he is perhaps too poor to marry or become engaged, as the young woman’s hand displays no engagement ring. The length of their courtship is indicated by the ivy having grown over her name, Amy, which was cut long ago into the tree.

Tagged: historyartpainting19th centuryvictorianlovetime

Source: preraphaelites.org

29th December 2011

Quote with 11 notes

You ride well, but you don’t kiss nicely at all.
— Thomas Hardy, A Pair of Blue Eyes (1873)

Tagged: litbooksvictorianlove19th century

22nd May 2011

Post

No, though she talk, it is music; her fingers desert not the keys; ‘tis
Song, though you hear in the song the articulate vocables sounded,
Syllabled singly and sweetly the words of melodious meaning.
I am in love, you say; I do not think so, exactly.

 — from Amours de Voyage by Arthur Hugh Clough (1849)

Tagged: poetrylithistoryvictorian19th centurylove

20th May 2011

Quote with 7 notes

By this he knew she wept with waking eyes:
That, at his hand’s light quiver by her head,
The strange low sobs that shook their common bed
Were called into her with a sharp surprise,
And strangely mute, like little gasping snakes,
Dreadfully venomous to him. She lay
Stone-still, and the long darkness flowed away
With muffled pulses. Then, as midnight makes
Her giant heart of Memory and Tears
Drink the pale drug of silence, and so beat
Sleep’s heavy measure, they from head to feet
Were moveless, looking through their dead black years,
By vain regret scrawled over the blank wall.
Like sculptured effigies they might be seen
Upon their marriage-tomb, the sword between;
Each wishing for the sword that severs all.
— From Modern Love, by George Meredith (1862)

Tagged: poetrylithistory19th centuryvictorianlove

17th May 2011

Quote with 8 notes

That moment she was mine, mine, fair,
Perfectly pure and good: I found
A thing to do, and all her hair
In one long yellow string l wound
Three times her little throat around,
And strangled her. No pain felt she;
I am quite sure she felt no pain.
— From ‘Porphyria’s Lover’, by Robert Browning (1836/1842)

Tagged: poetrylovedeathlit19th centuryvictorian